Tag Archives for " successful brands "

14 Successful brands are built on beliefs. Not products.

Most people never think about the important underpinings of their brand. They just want to deliver a good product. Build the business. Make some sales. And earn a good living.

That’s understandable. But the most successful small businesses — and all the beloved, billion-dollar brands — are built on a solid foundation of shared values and beliefs. And those values go way beyond product attributes.

6 Keen Footwear is a great branding case study. If the shoe fits.

Apparently, I have peasant feet. At least that’s what the nice salesgirl at REI told me…

Back in medieval Europe, peasant’s feet were short and stubby, with toes that were close to the same length. The nobility, on the other hand, had narrow, pointy feet, with toes that tapered off like an Egyptian profile.

Keen shoes branding, advertising, marketing

Keen shoes are designed to fit difficult peasant feet.

Keen shoes seem to be tailor-made for peasants. But I don’t think that’s part of the brand strategy at Keen.

I’ve purchased two pairs of Keens for work, one pair of sandals, and a pair of light hikers, and I’ve never heard anything about catering to peasants. Or fit, for that matter. All their branding efforts revolve around the theme of the “hybrid life.”

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3 Three logical reasons why brands need more emotional thinking.

In the battle between right-brained marketing people, and left-brained finance people, the left brainers usually win.

They have data, spreadsheets, and the graphs to support their decisions. We have gut instinct, intuition, and experience.

But we also have some good, empirical evidence that suggests the analytical approach really isn’t the way to go when it comes to many business decisions. Especially when it comes to branding.

6 Small brands, big attitudes. How to create an XXL brand personality

What does it take to turn a typical small business into a powerful brand? Why do some businesses — with relatively mundane products and services — take off, while others stagnate?

Often it comes down to personality. Or lack thereof.

5 How to make your website work — on many levels.

There seems to be a trend in website development these days… more and more cookie-cutter, template-driven websites that are wearily one dimensional.

The fact is, if you want the maximum return from your website investment, it needs to work on many different levels.

19 Brand authenticity — Keeping it real, honest, genuine and true.

I hate buzzwords. Every time a new marketing term shows up on the cover of a book I find myself having to translate the jargon into something meaningful for ordinary, busy business people.

Lately, it’s “Authenticity.” Seems “keeping it real” has become a household term. And a branding imperative.

4 Class A Offices. Class C Websites.

Moved into a swanky new office building last week. (Great views of Mt. Bachelor, Broken Top, Three Sisters and the Phoenix Inn parking lot.)

The Alexander Drake Building, Downtown Bend, OR As I was unpacking boxes, lifting heavy furniture and contemplating the feng shui, it occurred to me that professional service firms spend a lot of time and money on their office space. And rightly so.

3 The Olympics — The world’s most powerful brand?

I love the Winter Olympics.

I got hooked as a boy when Franz Klammer made his infamous gold medal run at the Innsbruck Games, and I’ve been watching ever since. I have to admit, I even watch some of the ice skating. (But no Ice Dancing.)

6 A brand worth watching. And flying.

Here’s a news flash for all of you who are 35 or under: Flying wasn’t always this bad. There was a time when racking up frequent flyers miles was, actually, a little glamorous. You could fly the friendly skies and have a pleasant time. Sometimes it even lived up to the advertised brand experience.

Sorry you missed it.

In the age of strip searches, baggage fees and laptop bans, most airlines are as bad as Greyhound busses. Cattle have it better on the way to the slaughterhouse. Every time I board a flight I think, “wow, there’s gotta be an opportunity here for an airline to do things differently.”

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4 Putting Amazon In Perspective

How could my 79-year-old mother possibly be a poster child for Amazon.com? When it comes to technology, she’s utterly hopeless… She’s never written or received an e-mail in her life. She’s never Googled anything, or referred to Wikipedia. And to her, a twitter is something finches do.

And yet here she is, contently reading yet another novel on her Amazon Kindle.

The new Kindle.

The new Kindle.

About a year ago my mom had a “micro stroke” that affected the optical nerve in her right eye. Made it almost impossible to read for any length of time, and typical, 12-point type is almost impossible to decipher. To make matters worse, the little library in her town can’t afford many large print books. So she was stuck.

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