Tag Archives for " ADVERTISING "

5 Want to build a brand? First, own an idea.

I think all entrepreneurs should study advertising. Entrepreneurs are full of ideas, and advertising is an industry of ideas… Ideas on how to build a brand. How to build credibility and authenticity for existing brands. How to engage an audience and convert leads into sales. It’s those big ideas — paired with exceptional execution — that produce growth for clients and vault agencies into the national spotlight.

The same can be said for start-ups. Businesses that start with a big idea, and then stick to it, are the ones that become iconic brands.

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6 Truth, Lies, and Advertising Honesty.

I don’t comment on politics. However, the recent political dialog has certainly inspired this week’s speech on brand authenticity, honesty and truth in advertising.

In politics, the standards for lying are lower than they are in business. You can sling mud and hurl half-truths at your opponent and get away with it. He’ll simply sling it back.

In business, it doesn’t work that way. If you say nasty things about your competitors, you’ll probably get sued. It’s actually illegal to blatantly mislead consumers, and if you live in a small town, like I do, disparaging a competitor will almost always come back to bite you in the Karmic ass.

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6 Keen Footwear is a great branding case study. If the shoe fits.

Apparently, I have peasant feet. At least that’s what the nice salesgirl at REI told me…

Back in medieval Europe, peasant’s feet were short and stubby, with toes that were close to the same length. The nobility, on the other hand, had narrow, pointy feet, with toes that tapered off like an Egyptian profile.

Keen shoes branding, advertising, marketing

Keen shoes are designed to fit difficult peasant feet.

Keen shoes seem to be tailor-made for peasants. But I don’t think that’s part of the brand strategy at Keen.

I’ve purchased two pairs of Keens for work, one pair of sandals, and a pair of light hikers, and I’ve never heard anything about catering to peasants. Or fit, for that matter. All their branding efforts revolve around the theme of the “hybrid life.”

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3 The secret, missing ingredient of content marketing.

It’s the age of information, and much of the marketing buzz these days revolves around “content marketing.” Especially for business -to-business marketers, it’s all the rage.

We have YouTube videos, webinars, articles, blog posts, 24/7 Tweets, Powerpoint Presentations, Facebook updates, websites, ebooks, and white papers coming out our ears.

In many cases, it’s just too much information. Or at least, too much of the wrong kind of information.

In an effort to “push valuable content” to prospects, some internet marketers are inundating people with more and more information. And there’s something troubling about the quality of that content:

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3 Three logical reasons why brands need more emotional thinking.

In the battle between right-brained marketing people, and left-brained finance people, the left brainers usually win.

They have data, spreadsheets, and the graphs to support their decisions. We have gut instinct, intuition, and experience.

But we also have some good, empirical evidence that suggests the analytical approach really isn’t the way to go when it comes to many business decisions. Especially when it comes to branding.

3 Success in copywriting: Mix up the words for better results.

Sometimes, one single word is everything. The difference between a marketing home run and a dribbling bunt. I recently ran into a client who was completely fixated on one word in a headline: “Precious.” “Babies are precious, not parking places,” she argued. “Yes, but diamonds are also precious. And what’s more valuable than diamonds?” I countered.

2 Disruption as a branding discipline.

The word for the day is Disruption, with a capital D.

In our society there’s a stigma against all things deemed disruptive. When you’re in elementary school you learn to not be disruptive in class. Sit still in church and don’t disrupt the service. By the 6th grade it’s “don’t cause a scene or call attention to yourself. Don’t be different. Be the same.”

Write like everyone else. Dress like everyone else. Behave like everyone else and you’ll get along just fine.

That’s the message we got, and it’s the message our kids are getting. Loud and clear.

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2 Travel industry advertising – Wales misses the fairway by a mile.

Humor me for a minute. I seldom use the Brand Insight Blog to critique ads. It’s just too easy to just snipe about details like an idiotic headline or the lazy use of stock photography. But I recently ran across an ad for Wales that’s simply too bad to pass up.

It’s a perfect example of what’s missing from most brand messages and a relevant case study of what NOT to do in travel industry advertising.

First, a little background on golfers and golf travel. Golfers spend a lot of money supporting their habit. We buy $400 drivers and travel great distances to play exceptional golf courses. But we’re not stupid. We shop around just like anyone else and make darn sure we’re getting the best experience possible when booking a trip.

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2 Super Sales vs. Super Brands.

It’s discount days in the retail world right now. Everywhere you turn there’s a super sale, an inventory reduction, a clearance event or other equally banal form of discount.

Sign of the times, I suppose. Store owners are desperate to get people in the door, even if it causes long-term damage to the brand.

But does discounting really hurt your brand?

That’s a good question… one that often leads to blazing debates between ad agency folks and their clients. The creatives are quick to condemn anything that involves a price point. But the client wants to “move the needle” and “get an immediate ROI” on every advertising dollar. He feels that any sort of “image” advertising is a waste of time. Then there’s the agency Account Executive, trying desperately to bring the two sides together in a sort of middle-east accord that will save the account for another year.

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