Category Archives for "Marketing"

Truth and clarity about Guerrilla Marketing

It’s 1810. Napolean’s armies have conquered all of Europe and are enjoying the spoils. But in Spain, small bands of dedicated freedom fighters wage their own war against the occupying forces. They strike. Move. Hide. And strike again. They involve the enemy in a long, drawn-out war, and ultimately prevail.

That’s how the term Guerrilla Warfare came to be. The literal, Spanish translation is “small war.”

Fast forward to 1983. Jay Conrad Levinson, an old-school, advertising guy from Chicago, borrows the term for a marketing book he’s writing. “Guerrilla Marketing” becomes one of the most popular business books of all time, with endless spin-offs and merchandise tie-ins.

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8 Brands Of Love On Valentine’s Day

Valentines-Day-background_mainI’ll never forget my first pair of skis… Hand-me-down Heads from a by-gone era. Jet black. Heavy as can be, but oh so lovable! Since then, I’ve purchased eight more pairs of skis and four were the same brand: Head.

The latest is a pair of Head Rev 105s, and I’m absolutely loving them. I test drove many different brands — and they were all good — but I chose Head. Every time I ski on them, and every time I see another Olympic racer on the podium with their Heads at their side, I get even more attached to that brand. It’s a life long love affair.

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2 Sports Marketing: Branding & The Olympic Rings

The Winter Olympics begin this week from the balmy town of town of Sochi, Russia. Not my idea of a glamorous winter setting, but no matter where they’re held, I love the Winter Games.

sochi-2014-logo-4I got hooked as a boy when Franz Klammer made his infamous, gold medal downhill run at the Innsbruck Games, and I’ve been watching ever since. I’ve even watched some of the curling over the years.

The summer games are fun too, but they don’t have the thrill-factor of the winter games. A diver doing a twisting three-and-a-half into a pool just isn’t as compelling as a guy on skis doing a triple flip with five twists.

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2 The Duck Dynasty brand goes high fashion.

How do you know when the alignment of the planets has gone completely askew? When the guys from Duck Dynasty are featured in GQ magazine.

Yessir, that’s right. The Robertson clan has risen from the swamps of Louisiana to the pages of GQ. On one page you have Bradley Cooper, “the prettiest man on the planet,” throwing the F word around and the next page you have the Duck Dynasty dudes in their branded cammo-wear quoting bible passages. What’s next? Forbes?

Oh, wait. They’ve been there, done that too.

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2 Non-profit branding… a story of start-up success and failure.

In 2009 I called it “A feel-good brand in a bummed out world.” It was the type of organization that genuinely touched people, and put smiles on faces. For me, a few minutes at Working Wonders Children’s Museum was a sure cure for a crummy day.

WWLogo - smallOur story of success, and failure, is valuable for anyone who’s starting a new business or running a non-profit organization.

When we started Working Wonders we did a lot things right. It was “by the book” all the way. First, we thoroughly researched the market and determined that there was a gaping need. Then we wrote a mission-focused brand strategy, and built a business plan around that. We came up with a great name, designed a nice logo and put an operational plan in place based on our cohesive brand platform.

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5 Strategic Thinking vs. Tactical Acting

The single most popular article I’ve ever written focuses on the difference between marketing strategy and marketing tactics.

Seems there’s a bit of confusion there. For example, I saw a blog recently titled “Top 10 Social Media Strategies.” But the list was purely tactical. Not a strategy to be seen.

So if you’re one of thousands who is still a bit unclear, you can read the original article. Or here’s another way to look at it…

At BNBranding we talk about Insight vs. Execution. Insight being the crucial strategic thinking that has to happen before you execute the tactical plan. Think, then act.

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5 How to conjure up a new business name.

Eons ago, advertising pioneer Claude Hopkins said “a good name should almost be an advertisement in its own right.”

He wrote the original bible on the subject, called “Scientific Advertising.” And now, some 90 years later, recent studies in behavioral economics and psychology show that many of his theories were dead on.

There’s a proven correlation between a memorable name and market value of the company.

Fortune 500 companies have figured that out. They pay naming firms huge sums to concoct new words that eventually become successful brands. Those firms employ teams of poets, neologists, writers, comedians, behavioral psychologists and linguists to come up with names like “Acura for Honda’s luxury car division. “Pentium” for an Intel Processor. Viagra for, well, you know what.

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4 3 Easy Resolutions For Better Branding.

2014 promises to be a great year for business owners and marketers who are willing to follow a few simple resolutions. I could have written a dozen or so, but that would go against the number one resolution:

• Resolve to be short and sweet.

There’s a proven paradox in marketing communications that says: The less you say, the more they hear. So stop with the generalities and the corporate double speak. Instead, try plain English. Hone in one specific idea and pound it home with powerful mental images and just a few, relevant details.

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1 How to build brand credibility, one detail at a time.

The brands I work with are not like WalMart. They don’t spend a half a billion dollars a year flooding the airwaves with traditional advertising. They don’t have enough money to sway public opinion in their favor. And all of them face stiff competition from bigger businesses.

Last week I had to convince a retail client that he couldn’t change people’s minds regarding his biggest competitors; the big box stores.

“You can’t compete on price,” I said.

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5 Want to build a brand? First, own an idea.

I think all entrepreneurs should study advertising.

Advertising is an industry of ideas. Great ideas — paired with exceptional execution — produce growth for clients, win awards, and vault agencies into the national spotlight.

The same can be said for brands. Businesses that start with a big idea, and then stick to it, are the ones that become iconic brands.

Campbell’s owns the idea of “comfort food.” That brand is not about the soup, it’s about the rainy day when your kids are home for lunch and you sit down for a bowl of soup and grilled cheese sandwiches. Campbell’s warms, comforts, nourishes, takes you back in time and puts a smile on your face. All for less than a buck.

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