Category Archives for "Branding"

8 Brands Of Love On Valentine’s Day

Valentines-Day-background_mainI’ll never forget my first pair of skis… Hand-me-down Heads from a by-gone era. Jet black. Heavy as can be, but oh so lovable! Since then, I’ve purchased eight more pairs of skis and four were the same brand: Head.

The latest is a pair of Head Rev 105s, and I’m absolutely loving them. I test drove many different brands — and they were all good — but I chose Head. Every time I ski on them, and every time I see another Olympic racer on the podium with their Heads at their side, I get even more attached to that brand. It’s a life long love affair.

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2 Sports Marketing: Branding & The Olympic Rings

The Winter Olympics begin this week from the balmy town of town of Sochi, Russia. Not my idea of a glamorous winter setting, but no matter where they’re held, I love the Winter Games.

sochi-2014-logo-4I got hooked as a boy when Franz Klammer made his infamous, gold medal downhill run at the Innsbruck Games, and I’ve been watching ever since. I’ve even watched some of the curling over the years.

The summer games are fun too, but they don’t have the thrill-factor of the winter games. A diver doing a twisting three-and-a-half into a pool just isn’t as compelling as a guy on skis doing a triple flip with five twists.

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2 The Duck Dynasty brand goes high fashion.

How do you know when the alignment of the planets has gone completely askew? When the guys from Duck Dynasty are featured in GQ magazine.

Yessir, that’s right. The Robertson clan has risen from the swamps of Louisiana to the pages of GQ. On one page you have Bradley Cooper, “the prettiest man on the planet,” throwing the F word around and the next page you have the Duck Dynasty dudes in their branded cammo-wear quoting bible passages. What’s next? Forbes?

Oh, wait. They’ve been there, done that too.

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2 Paralysis by analysis – How fear and data can kill great marketing.

In golf, over analysis never produces good results. If you’re thinking too much — plotting the shot, rethinking the shot, regripping the club and worrying about the position of the left pinky at the moment of impact — you’re going to fail.

Businessman ThinkingSame thing happens in many marketing departments and small businesses. People get stuck in a rut of overanalysis. They think things to death and worry about all the wrong details. When they finally pull the trigger on something, it flops. Which, of course, makes it even harder to pull the trigger the next time.

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1 The not-so-surprising failure of Sears.

The Sears store in my hometown recently closed its doors. Shut down after a 60 year presence in the market.

Can’t say I’m too broken up about it either. I bought a few tools there, once upon a time. And an appliance or two, but nothing I can recall. I certainly wouldn’t say I had any fond memories of the place, much less brand allegiance.

The recent demise of Sears, once the country’s largest retailer, is replete with lessons for business owners, entrepreneurs, marketing execs and brand managers. It’s a classic American entrepreneurial tale.

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1 Fake Thrills — Another Automotive Marketing Misfire.

Automotive advertising, as a category, is notoriously bad. And the Toyota Camry is not an exciting car. In fact, some automotive writers contend that Toyota’s building nothing but toasters these days. Despite that, the Camry has been hugely successful and has been the best-selling car in America 15 of the past 16 years. (Camry was No. 1 from 1997 to 2000, lost to the Honda Accord in 2001, and has reigned since then.)

Apparently, there’s a huge segment of the driving population that does not care about horsepower or handling or sexiness. Just reliable, utilitarian, point-A to point-B transportation for this crowd. My father drives one, and he fits the demographic perfectly… white, suburban 80-year old male who only drives a few miles a month. The last thing he’s looking for in a car is a thrill ride.

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1 The ABCs of Branding: RCD

Relevance. Credibility. Differentiation. These are the basic building blocks of any branding effort. When you look at companies — large and small — that have been successful, you’ll notice strength, consistency and often superiority in those three areas.

Relevance.

Brand relevance is closely related to specialization and niche marketing. Because you can’t be relevant to everyone. My friend Preston Thompson painstakingly crafts high-end guitars for discerning bluegrass musicians who are looking for a very specific, classic, Martin-like sound.

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2 Non-profit branding… a story of start-up success and failure.

In 2009 I called it “A feel-good brand in a bummed out world.” It was the type of organization that genuinely touched people, and put smiles on faces. For me, a few minutes at Working Wonders Children’s Museum was a sure cure for a crummy day.

WWLogo - smallOur story of success, and failure, is valuable for anyone who’s starting a new business or running a non-profit organization.

When we started Working Wonders we did a lot things right. It was “by the book” all the way. First, we thoroughly researched the market and determined that there was a gaping need. Then we wrote a mission-focused brand strategy, and built a business plan around that. We came up with a great name, designed a nice logo and put an operational plan in place based on our cohesive brand platform.

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5 How to conjure up a new business name.

Eons ago, advertising pioneer Claude Hopkins said “a good name should almost be an advertisement in its own right.”

He wrote the original bible on the subject, called “Scientific Advertising.” And now, some 90 years later, recent studies in behavioral economics and psychology show that many of his theories were dead on.

There’s a proven correlation between a memorable name and market value of the company.

Fortune 500 companies have figured that out. They pay naming firms huge sums to concoct new words that eventually become successful brands. Those firms employ teams of poets, neologists, writers, comedians, behavioral psychologists and linguists to come up with names like “Acura for Honda’s luxury car division. “Pentium” for an Intel Processor. Viagra for, well, you know what.

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5 Want to build a brand? First, own an idea.

I think all entrepreneurs should study advertising.

Advertising is an industry of ideas. Great ideas — paired with exceptional execution — produce growth for clients, win awards, and vault agencies into the national spotlight.

The same can be said for brands. Businesses that start with a big idea, and then stick to it, are the ones that become iconic brands.

Campbell’s owns the idea of “comfort food.” That brand is not about the soup, it’s about the rainy day when your kids are home for lunch and you sit down for a bowl of soup and grilled cheese sandwiches. Campbell’s warms, comforts, nourishes, takes you back in time and puts a smile on your face. All for less than a buck.

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